Winning and Losing in Mobile Content



Published August 2003. 130 pages

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

1. Introduction to Winning and Losing in Mobile Content

  • Exploding the content myth
  • Value Network v. Value Chain
  • Focussing on the Consumer Market
  • Industry Obsession with Killer Application
  • Inefficient distribution models and capital leakage
  • Timing of Market Entry
  • Global evidence for consistency in mobile content market evolutions
  • The Japanese mobile content market lead
  • The Underdeveloped North American and European mobile content markets
  • The Evolving market: Moving to Profitability
  • Figure 1.1 The traditional view of the industry as a "Value chain"
  • Figure 1.2 The Value Network
  • Figure 1.3 Dual approaches to mobile market problems

2. Structure of this Report

  • Figure 2.1 Report flow chart

3. Who is involved in mobile content?

  • Reasons for involvement in mobile content
  • Opportunists
  • The Evidence from Japan and Korea
  • The success of SMS in European
  • Legacies of the wireless boom
  • Leveraging existing assets
  • Defenders
  • Traditional revenue displacement
  • Mobile content and maintaining ARPU
  • Undefined roles in Europe and North America
  • Figure 3.1 Mobile content valuations for Japan based on industry evidence
  • Figure 3.2 Average spend by Japanese consumers on mobile content
  • Figure 3.3 A theoretical prediction of mobile content markets

4. The Value Network

  • Defining roles in mobile content market
  • Front and back end mobile content provision
  • Understanding positioning in the current content market
  • Applying market knowledge to core competencies
  • Figure 4.1 Front and back end of the Distribution process

5. Pure Mobile Players

  • Figure 5.1 Pure mobile players short term positioning
  • Figure 5.2 Pure mobile players long term positioning

6. Mobile Operators

  • Figure 6.1 Mobile Operators short term positioning
  • Figure 6.2 Mobile Operators long term positioning

7. Non Mobile Players

  • Figure 7.1 Non-mobile players short term positioning
  • Figure 7.2 Non-mobile players long term positioning

8. Roles within the value network

  • Mobile Internet Service Provision
  • IP Licensing
  • Content Provision
  • Content Aggregation
  • Aggregation and the Volume Premium
  • The Long Term Effectiveness of Aggregation
  • Figure 8.1 Demand for major licenses as a function of market status
  • Figure 8.2 Examples of major licensing deals between mobile and non-mobile players
  • Figure 8.3 Cost and barriers to entry of content development as a function of market status
  • Figure 8.4 Relationship structure of a content Aggregator
  • Figure 8.5 Revenue shares of a content Aggregator
  • Figure 8.6 Evolution of content Aggregators business model

9. Mobile content ROI and market status

  • Understanding the mobile Operators positioning within a market
  • Defining the relative stage of Market development
  • Volume markets
  • Value markets
  • Transition markets
  • Figure 9.1 Mobile market evolution – Volume to Value
  • Figure 9.2 Mobile Operator strategies in Volume markets

10. Operator Content Strategies

  • Core competencies determine positioning within the Industry
  • Mobile content in a Volume market
  • Mobile content in a Transition market
  • Mobile content in a Value market
  • The Mobile Operator as a Defender
  • Figure 10.1 Mobile Operator strategies – Volume to Value markets

11. Distribution Models

  • What is distribution?
  • Why is distribution important?
  • The Distribution Process
  • Visibility
  • Payment
  • Delivery
  • Assessing Distribution Models
  • Figure 11.1 Overview of the distribution process

12. Visibility

  • Repeat usage
  • Methods to mobile content Visibility
  • Visibility: Operator menu system
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Visibility: Content Aggregators
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Visibility: Internet
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Visibility: Merging existing product lines
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Visibility: Media Channels
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Visibility: Retail
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Figure 12.1 Overview of network and non-network based visibility methods
  • Figure 12.2 Survey of industry visibility methods
  • Figure 12.3 Pie chart of industry visibility methods
  • Figure 12.4 Comparative of visibility methods
  • Figure 12.5 Schematic of a typical Operator menu system
  • Figure 12.6 forecasts for Vodafone Live! Enabled handset owners

13. Payment

  • Popular methods for mobile content payment
  • Payment: Operator branded micropayments
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Payment: Messaging based
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Payment: Premium rate calls (IVR)
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Payment: Retail
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Figure 13.1 Network and non-network based payment models
  • Figure 13.2 Survey of industry payment methods
  • Figure 13.3 Pie chart of industry payment methods
  • Figure 13.4 Comparative of payment methods
  • Figure 13.5 i-mode revenue shares
  • Figure 13.6 Vodafone Live! Revenue shares
  • Figure 13.7 Revenue shares from premium rate SMS

14. Delivery

  • Popular methods for mobile content delivery
  • Delivery: Mobile internet
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Delivery: Message based
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Delivery: Mobile Middleware
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Delivery: Point-to-point
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Figure 14.1 Network and non-network based delivery models
  • Figure 14.2 Survey of industry delivery methods
  • Figure 14.3 Pie chart of industry delivery methods
  • Figure 14.4 Comparative of delivery methods
  • Figure 14.5 Comparative of friction in distribution models

15. The Evolution of the Mobile Content Market

  • Four stages of Mobile Content Market Development
  • The Emerging mobile content market
  • Unsustainable profits in an Emerging Market
  • The Developing mobile content market
  • Barriers to entry to the Developing Market
  • Bridging the gap between Developing and Maturing mobile content markets
  • The Maturing mobile content market
  • The Maturing mobile content market and non-mobile players
  • The Maturing mobile content market and continuous reinvestment of profits
  • The end of the positive feedback cycle
  • The Matured mobile content market
  • Figure 15.1 comparative barriers to entry in market stages
  • Figure 15.2 capital leakage caused by inefficient distribution models
  • Figure 15.3 the positive feedback cycle
  • Figure 15.4 the matured market and the positive feedback cycle

16. The Mobile Content Ecosystem

  • Adoption of Operator branded mobile internet services
  • The evolution of mobile content
  • Defining the Ecosystem
  • Clear definition of roles and responsibilities
  • Consumer benefits of the mobile content Ecosystem
  • Industry benefits of the mobile content Ecosystem
  • Handset manufacturers and the mobile content Ecosystem

17. Winning and Losing Case Studies

  • i-mode
  • Digital Bridges
  • Bandai
  • Taito
  • Cybird
  • Asahi
  • MTV Networks Europe

18. Summary of Recommendations

  • Winning and Losing in Mobile Content: Corporate Strategy
  • Summary of recommendations for Non-Mobile Media Companies in a Developing market
  • Summary of recommendations for Pure Mobile Players in a Developing market
  • Summary of Recommendations for Operators in a Developing market
  • Summary of recommendations for Non-Mobile Media Companies in a Maturing market
  • Summary of recommendations for Pure Mobile Players in a Maturing market
  • Summary of recommendations for Operators in a Maturing market
  • Summary of recommendations for Non-Mobile Media Companies in a Matured market
  • Summary of recommendations for Pure Mobile Players in a Matured market
  • Summary of recommendations for Operators in a Matured market

19. Mobile Content Statistics Valuations

  • Figure 19.1 Relative maturation of mobile gaming in Europe, North America and Asia
  • Figure 19.2 Relative maturation of mobile music and ringtones in Europe, North America and Asia
  • Figure 19.3 Moderate forecasts for mobile game market valuation in Asia-Pacific 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.4 Aggressive forecasts for mobile game market valuation in Asia-Pacific 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.5 Conservative forecasts for mobile game market valuation in Asia-Pacific 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.6 Moderate forecasts for mobile game market valuation in Europe 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.7 Aggressive forecasts for mobile game market valuation in Europe 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.8 Conservative forecasts for mobile game market valuation in Europe 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.9 Moderate forecasts for mobile game market valuation in North America 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.10 Aggressive forecasts for mobile game market valuation in North America 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.11 Conservative forecasts for mobile game market valuation in North America 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.12 Moderate forecasts for information content market valuation in Asia Pacific 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.13 Aggressive forecasts for information content market valuation in Asia Pacific 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.14 Conservative forecasts for information content market valuation in Asia Pacific 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.15 Moderate forecasts for information content market valuation in Europe 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.16 Aggressive forecasts for information content market valuation in Europe 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.17 Conservative forecasts for information content market valuation in Europe 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.18 Moderate forecasts for information content market valuation in North America 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.19 Aggressive forecasts for information content market valuation in North America 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.20 Conservative forecasts for information content market valuation in North America 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.21 Moderate forecasts for ringtones and mobile music market valuation in Asia Pacific 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.22 Aggressive forecasts for ringtones and mobile music market valuation in Asia Pacific 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.23 Conservative forecasts for ringtones and mobile music market valuation in Asia Pacific 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.24 Moderate forecasts for ringtones and mobile music market valuation in Europe 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.25 Aggressive forecasts for ringtones and mobile music market valuation in Europe 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.26 optimistic forecasts for ringtones and mobile music market valuation in Europe 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.27 Moderate forecasts for ringtones and mobile music market valuation in North America 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.28 Aggressive forecasts for ringtones and mobile music market valuation in North America 2002-2006
  • Figure 19.29 Conservative forecasts for ringtones and mobile music market valuation in North America 2002-2006

Glossary

The Report Authors



Questions? Need more information?
Call us at 972-818-8225 or e-mail: Reports@AlexanderResources.com

HOME | Reports | Guarantee | Description | Executive Summary and Major Conclusions
| Table of Contents | Author | Order |


© 2009 Alexander Resources.